Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Replacement window help


I posted a question in the discussion forum, but I don't have a good feel yet of which people respond to yet- posts or discussions. So, I'll post it here too!
Basically, I want to know what ya'll have done to replace your windows.
We have a whopping 26 windows in this house- all original from 1911- and we definitely need to replace a few of them before winter- we know we can't afford to do it all at once, but we want to make a long-term plan and are comparing products. One of our challenges is that we have stained and leaded glass in many of the tops sections of our windows (see pic) and we don't know how to salvage that with replacement. The best window companies have told us is to take the panes out and hang them next to the new window with eyehooks...

sigh...
We are considering both Marvin Ultimate Double Hung inserts (pricey!!) and Marvin tilt-pacs...
advice anyone?
Has anyone ever installed the tilt-pacs themselves? Is it as easy as they claim? Suggestions on other brands, or anything?
Thanks!!!

5 comments:

StuccoHouse said...

Is there a specific reason you want to replace them? Old windows are pretty easy to restore & weatherproof and that old growth wood & divided wavy glass is pretty awesome. Added bonus, it's not at all expensive. You'd be surprised at how "new" you can make them look, but still keep the originals. A number of bloggers at houseblogs.net have done/are doing this (me included)...

Nadja and Sean said...

There are a few reasons- the windows are REALLY drafty, a few of the panes of glass are actually cracked and some of the pulleys are broken. And, we live on a busier street, so there isn't a lot of noise barrier in what we have now. We aren't set on replacement, but we don't know if we could restore them with new energy efficient glass...
We know we wouldn't replace the entire frame if we went with replacements- which is why we like the double-hung insert product from Marvin (it just replaces the inner part of the window but not the casing/frame (i think that's what you call it- i'm not up on the window vocabulary enough yet...)but that's an expensive product too. Thanks for your help!

carol said...

If I were you, I would call a professional window restorer- it would be a crime to get rid of those gorgeous upper sashes! A professional can make cuts in the original sashes that form a channel and then mount a metal weather strip on the actual window frames. Ours have that and I think if you search House in Progress, they descirbe the same thing there. It cuts down all the drafts. The other thing you should do (esp. in MN) is install some type of storm windows, depending on your budget. Aesthetics aside, at least you will have saved the old windows. When you get the weight pockets open to fix the sash cords(which is easy to do) you can also insulate the pockets with strips of that polystyrene insulation. The old windows are superior like Stucco says- yours are already 100 years old! Newer sashes are only graded to last 10 or 20 years. Please do all you can to save 'em.
Carol

Andrea R said...

Our house has 5 stained glass windows, and the older ones were replaced by the previous owners. They installed new winows on the 8outside* of the stianed glass ones.

in the dining room, where they were double-hung with the top part stianed & leaded, they removed the plain lower half of the priginal windows. Plain clear glass unopenable windows were installed behind them (or in front of when looking at them from outside).

They did the same thing in the foyer, but the window on the stiar landing was fully pieced, so they put a full window in front of it. It doesn't open either.

(I can provide pics. Stop by my blog - http://www.atypicalife.net/blog/)

Bev said...

in case you';re still checking on windows: update for older historical windows

http://www.jambliners.com/